Weekly Digest #95: Metacognition

Weekly Digest #95: Metacognition

Metacognition refers broadly to thinking about your thinking. Within the education realm, metacognition has been used to argue for a wide variety of various activities, which may extend beyond the research evidence. Nevertheless, we have argued before that metacognition is important and can be utilized in the classroom, but today we provide a list of resources that further describe the research that demonstrates the benefits of metacognition as well as concrete classroom applications.

Image from Pixabay

Image from Pixabay

1)      Boosting Metacognition through In-Class Assessments by Jen McCabe @improvewmetacog

In this blog post, Jen McCabe describes how she used metacognition through “Knowledge, Connection, and Application” quizzes and the feedback that she received from students. While this blog post provides an excellent example of utilizing metacognition to improve student learning, there are many posts worth reading on this site.

 

2)      Strategies for Teaching Metacognition in Classrooms by David Owen and Alvin Vista @alvin_vista

In this article, the authors argue that metacognition is a teachable skill, which is how it is often described in the education world (and slightly different than the process we discuss in cognitive psychology). They provide a brief description of the research supporting their recommendations, which can be applied to students of all ages.

Image from cited source

Image from cited source

 

3)      Meta-Learning: The Importance of Thinking about Learning by Maya Bialik @MayaBialik

In this post, Maya Bialik breaks down the various components of metacognition and how they can be applied to the classroom. She provides some concrete suggestions as well as a lengthy list of background research to support her claims.

Image from cited source

Image from cited source

 

4)      Metacognition by Nancy Chick @vandycft

The Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt provides this thorough review of the literature on metacognition. In addition, you will find additional practical applications for the classroom that differ from many recommendations found in other resources.

 

5)      Metacognition and Student Learning by James Lang @LangOnCourse

In this Chronicle post, James Lang describes a conversation with Stephen Chew @SChewPsych about metacognition in the classroom, but also on reality tv shows!


Every Sunday, we pick a theme and provide a curated list of links. If you have a theme suggestion, please don’t hesitate to contact us! Occasionally we publish a guest digest, and If you'd like to propose a guest digest click here. Our 5 most recent digests can be found here:

Weekly Digest #90: Ways To Keep Kids Engaged With Learning During Winter Break

Weekly Digest #91: Making Teaching Changes

Weekly Digest #92: Returning to School and Work after Break

Weekly Digest #93: Exercise and Learning 2.0

Weekly Digest #94: Resources for Language Learners

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