Weekly Digest #50: Our Most Popular Digests!

Weekly Digest #50: Our Most Popular Digests!

We have now composed 50 digests! We started the digest tradition because a reader asked us whether we put together learning resources and sent them out to readers. At this time we were thinking about the best way to feature other great learning resources on our site, but we had not come up with a good way to do this yet. From this, the weekly digest was born.

The nice thing about the digests is that it allows us to investigate a topic and find resources on topics that we may or may not know a lot about. We have compiled digests on education topics from how teachers utilize retrieval practice in their classrooms, to providing feedback on writing assignments, to self-care. This week, we thought we would look up our top 5 most visited digests and revisit that topic with one resource.

 

Weekly Digest #8: Study Tips for Students

This digest includes Retrievalpractice.org by Pooja Agarwal, @poojaagarwal. This site provides lots of resources and recommendations for how to use retrieval practice effectively. You can find more resources with student study tips in the original digest.

Image from Pixabay.com

Image from Pixabay.com

 

Weekly Digest #29: Why do You Procrastinate, and What Can You do About it?

 Why We Procrastinate, According To Science by JR Thorpe, @bustle. This journalistic piece, strongly based on science, presents four theories of procrastination and busts a few myths about procrastination. You can find more resources on procrastination in the original digest.

Image from linked source, originally from https://procrastinus.com

Image from linked source, originally from https://procrastinus.com

 

Weekly Digest #9: How to Talk About Learning Styles

This digest includes Which Common Educational Myth Limits Student Achievement? by Dr. Bobby Hoffman, @ifoundmo. This blog post is particularly strong on the many ways in which teaching to preferred learning styles could harm students, but also hits the other 3 criteria for usefulness.You can find more resources about talking about learning styles in the original digest.

Image from Pixabay.com

Image from Pixabay.com

 

Weekly Digest #41: Preparing a Syllabus

 This digest includes Project Syllabus by Society for the Teaching of Psychology, @TeachPsych. It contains a number of example syllabi for courses in psychology. While this page does have a list of general tips (see here), they go a step further and provide a number of examples. All of the syllabi on their page have been reviewed and deemed excellent (see their rubric for judging syllabi). The examples are from psychology courses, but there are many elements that are not psychology specific. Make sure to check out their “best practices” section for exemplary portions of syllabi such as calendars, course objectives, etc. You can find more resources providing help preparing a syllabus in the original digest.

Image from Pixabay.com

Image from Pixabay.com

 

Weekly Digest #26: How to Manage Group Work

This digest includes CATME Team-Maker , a researcher-run tool that gathers information from students through an online survey, and uses evidence-based algorithms to group students. You can find more resources about managing group work in the original digest.

Image from linked source

Image from linked source


Every Sunday, we pick a theme and provide a curated list of links. If you have a theme suggestion, please don’t hesitate to contact us! Occasionally we publish a guest digest, and If you'd like to propose a guest digest click here. Our 5 most recent digests can be found here:

Weekly Digest #45: Dual Coding, Sketchnoting, and Aphantasia

Weekly Digest #46: Ignite Discussions in the Classroom

Weekly Digest #47: Academic Lifestyle and Self Care

Weekly Digest #48: Tools for Neurodivergent Brains

Weekly Digest #49: Read to Me: Benefits of Reading to Children

GUEST POST: Putting the Learning Scientists’ Work into Practice (Part 1)

GUEST POST: Putting the Learning Scientists’ Work into Practice (Part 1)

How Much Guidance Should We Give Our Students?

How Much Guidance Should We Give Our Students?