Weekly Digest #14: How to Encourage Students to Transfer their Knowledge

Weekly Digest #14: How to Encourage Students to Transfer their Knowledge

For the past two weeks we have been discussing transfer and how difficult it is to achieve, despite being a common goal of educators. We hope that walking through some of the research on transfer helps to clarify why knowledge transfer is a complicated issue. Today, we want to provide you with more resources on why transfer is such an important topic as well as some concrete suggestions for how to achieve knowledge transfer in the classroom.

 
Photo from Twitter

Photo from Twitter

In this opinion piece, David Didau points out that we need to consider both knowledge and skills when we create learning objectives. He suggests that we scaffold learning, such that we start with knowledge acquisition and final achieve application of knowledge as the final learning goal.

 
Photo from Twitter

Photo from Twitter

In this article, the late Grant Wiggins provides a working definition of transfer and discusses concrete ways to make knowledge transfer successful in the classroom.

 

3) Transfer of Learning: Is There a Solution? By Christina Milos, @surreallyno

Cristina Milos walks through several concrete examples of assignments that can be used to encourage knowledge transfer for students. While much of the article focuses on mathematical problem solving, more general assignments are also provided.

Photo from linked source

Photo from linked source

 
Photo from linked source

Photo from linked source

In this Washington Post article, Valerie Strauss summarizes Larry Ferlazzo’s book, “Building A Community of Self-Motivated Learners: Strategies to Help Students Thrive In School and Beyond”.  The article provides excellent research-driven advice about how to encourage students to transfer knowledge throughout the learning process.

 

5) Students can't apply what they've learned by Eberly Center at Carnegie Mellon University

This is a resource worth bookmarking. The Eberly Center at Carnegie Mellon have put together an extremely user-friendly site that allows you to select the reasons why students are having a difficult time transferring knowledge in your class. You are then sent to a page with reasons why students are not transferring knowledge and advice for how to solve the problem – all backed by research!

Photo from Pixabay

Photo from Pixabay


A Student's Journey Through Learning: How Can Cognitive Psychologists Help?

A Student's Journey Through Learning: How Can Cognitive Psychologists Help?

What's Transfer, and Why is it so Hard to Achieve? (Part 2)

What's Transfer, and Why is it so Hard to Achieve? (Part 2)