Be Your Own Teacher: How To Study Verb Conjugations

Be Your Own Teacher: How To Study Verb Conjugations

By: Rachel Adragna

Many languages require the conjugation of verbs if they follow a pronoun. An effective way to study and learn these different conjugations is to use two stacks of flashcards simultaneously. One stack will consist of verbs, and the other stack will be the pronouns. Here I'll show you how to make the cards.

1) Pick two or three verbs (or as many as you wish) that you want to study and make flashcards for them. On one side, write the infinitive of the verb in English, and on the other side, write the infinitive of the verb in the foreign language (shown here in French).

 

2) Make a second stack of flashcards for the pronouns. On one side, write a pronoun. On the other side, write the correct conjugation for that pronoun, of each verb you have chosen to study. 

3) Once you have finished making the two stacks, pick one flash card from each and conjugate the chosen verb for the selected pronoun. Practice by saying aloud (and spelling) or writing the target conjugation in a sentence. 

4) Flip the card over only after you have spoken or written a response, to check that you used the correct conjugation.

5) Repeat steps 3 and 4 with a different pronoun card and verb card.

Helpful Tips:

  • Get a buddy! Even if someone does not speak the foreign language you are studying for, they can verify your responses with the information provided on the back of each card.

  • Alternate between showing the English or the foreign language side of the verb flash cards to strengthen your ability to identify the word and meaning.

  • Test yourself with these cards during a break between classes, or to prepare for an exam.


If you'd like to use flashcards to study something other than verbs, use this tutorial:

Be Your Own Teacher: How To Study With Flashcards

 

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