Weekly Digest #35: Taking Care of Yourself

Weekly Digest #35: Taking Care of Yourself

Self-care is always important, but given current political events, it is more crucial than ever. However, just as with time management (covered in last week’s digest), the internet is awash with mental health “tips” that aren’t necessarily grounded in research. In this digest, we have put together a few resources that are both evidence-based and open access. Please take a few minutes for yourself today, to explore and make use of these resources.

 
Image from Twitter

Image from Twitter

This blog post, published just a couple of days ago, could not have come at a better time. Dr. Lenihan’s motivation for writing it was the difficulty he experienced right after the US Election with feeling compelled to constantly check social media. The post discusses the evidence behind social contagion, and provides specific, simple advice for avoiding its negative impact on your mood.

 
Image by Steven Depolo

Image by Steven Depolo

This blog is the mental health equivalent of the Learning Scientists Blog! Dr. Susman’s goal is to provide “science-based information and resources to offer support, hope, inspiration, and encouragement to persons in recovery and to those who care about them”. Particularly relevant to current affairs is this piece from earlier this year on anger management for voters.

 

3) Online Relaxation Exercises By Dr. Prentiss Price-Evans

Image from linked source

Image from linked source

This article first puts forward the evidence behind relaxation exercise, and then briefly instructs the reader as to the best way to do the exercises. What follows is a series of audio tracks that guide you through brief (6-10 minute) breathing and relaxation exercises.

 

4) Coping in the Wake of Incidents of Mass Violence By Paolo del Vecchio & Dr. Maryann Robinson

Image from Pixabay.com

Image from Pixabay.com

This resource from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (@samhsagov) includes a series of guides, in English and Spanish, for how to cope after a tragedy. The blog post also includes a few quick tips, as well as links to other disaster assistance resources.

 

5) Be Happy: How to Bring More Joy to Your Life Free online course by Dr. Sonja Lyubomirsky @slyubomirsky

Still from course trailer

Still from course trailer

Dr. Lyubomirsky has dedicated her career to studying human happiness, and here’s why:

“Why is the scientific study of happiness important? In short, because most people believe that happiness is meaningful, desirable, and an important, worthy goal, because happiness is one of the most salient and significant dimensions of human experience and emotional life, because happiness yields numerous rewards for the individual, and because it makes for a better, healthier, stronger society. Along these lines, my current research addresses three critical questions: 1) What makes people happy?; 2) Is happiness a good thing?; and 3) How and why can people learn to lead happier and more flourishing lives?" - Source: http://sonjalyubomirsky.com/

The title may make you skeptical, but don’t worry: this is a legitimate, thoroughly evidence-based online course about happiness, and it’s completely free (otherwise we wouldn’t share it with you).


Every Sunday, we pick a theme and provide a curated list of links. If you have a theme suggestion, please don’t hesitate to contact us! Our 5 most recent digests can be found here:

Weekly Digest #30: Learning and Attention

Weekly Digest #31: Exercise and Learning

Weekly Digest #32: Evidence-based Learning Strategies for Learning Disabilities

Weekly Digest #33: Teaching Kids about Safety

Weekly Digest #34: Time Management

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