Figure 1 from Smith, Madan, and Weinstein, E-xcellence in Teaching (in press)

Figure 1. The bystander effect explains one dimension that determines whether a person will help a victim in need. When more people are around, people are less likely to help, thought to be because of a diffusion of responsibility. This figure provides a visual sketch of the bystander effect, where the person by himself is willing to help but in a crowd is not willing to help in the same situation. Individual images were obtained from Pixabay.com, and are free to reproduce. 

Figure 1. The bystander effect explains one dimension that determines whether a person will help a victim in need. When more people are around, people are less likely to help, thought to be because of a diffusion of responsibility. This figure provides a visual sketch of the bystander effect, where the person by himself is willing to help but in a crowd is not willing to help in the same situation. Individual images were obtained from Pixabay.com, and are free to reproduce.